Rear disk brake conversion.

Discussion in 'Aftermarket Products, Reviews & Installation' started by Tacoma Dave, Jul 24, 2013.

  1. Tacoma Dave

    Tacoma Dave Well-Known Member

    I don't understand why Toyota builds the Tacoma with drum brakes in the rear. Has anyone done a disc brake conversion?
     
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  3. whippersnapper02

    whippersnapper02 Negative Nancy

    The Tacoma has the best stopping distances in it's class. Most of the braking is done by the front not the rear. Having drums doesn't make it a terrible truck.

    As far as conversions go one guy did it and braking got worse. The Tundra Racing kit doesn't include a different proportional valve needed for the change. The guy regrets ever thinking about converting.
     
  4. OP
    Tacoma Dave

    Tacoma Dave Well-Known Member

    The brakes work great, its just old technology.
     
  5. whippersnapper02

    whippersnapper02 Negative Nancy

    Yeah but adding rear disks isn't going to magically give you the stopping distances of a 911 Turbo with carbon ceramic brakes.
     
  6. OffroadTaco4x4

    OffroadTaco4x4 Well-Known Member

    I agree with whipper, 80% of braking is done up front, so there is really no point of rear discs In the taco, if you want to stop a little fast you could upgrade your front discs and calipers but I don't really see the point.
     
  7. OP
    Tacoma Dave

    Tacoma Dave Well-Known Member

    Discs give you fast heat dissipation, better clamping force more even clamping force and they clean out better when you're offroading Toyota did a good job with the braking system on the Tacoma, it's 10 times better than the braking system on my Jeep.
     
  8. whippersnapper02

    whippersnapper02 Negative Nancy

    I don't think anyone has really had any issues with the drums on the track or offroad.

    Why is more clamping force needed for an empty bed? I remember when trucks had only rear ABS because the rear tires kept locking up during hard braking.
     
  9. tostidos

    tostidos Well-Known Member

    Vi Tang has a conversion to disc brakes in the rear, I myself am going to discs in the rear.

    Its a pain in the ass and its not as simple as it sounds. different amount of fluid is required for disc brakes to opperate. So you would have to figure out the correct amount of hose length for both and front brakes to work properly.
     
  10. OP
    Tacoma Dave

    Tacoma Dave Well-Known Member

    An adjustable proportioning valve helps when it comes to tuning the braking system. It's allot easier than digging rocks out of brake shoes. We used to pull the rear drums apart after every heat race and before the main to inspect for embedded rocks.
     
  11. whippersnapper02

    whippersnapper02 Negative Nancy

    I thinks it's more of a proportioning issue. Drums need low pressure and high volume vs disks needed high pressure and low volume to operate. Back when I was on the Ranger forums guys would swap to rear disk when swapping a Explorer 8.8 axle into their truck. Without that Sploder valve it wouldn't work. The rear brakes wouldn't even engage without it.
     
  12. tostidos

    tostidos Well-Known Member

    Ahh ok. Where would the valve be in line? after the master cylinder or at the brake itself?
     
  13. whippersnapper02

    whippersnapper02 Negative Nancy

    I know on Rangers it was on the firewall after the master. I has probably been built into the master of Tacomas. I haven't really look for it on my truck.
     
  14. beandip007

    beandip007 New Member

    Why would you want to go to disk breaks in the rear? Drums have a bigger surface area to stop the truck, greater surface area is great for hauling. How many big rigs do you see with disk breaks in the rear? They need all the surface area for the rears to stop safely with a load. This is one of the reasons the Taco has best in class payload and towing. Look at the Ridgline with its rear disk brakes and independent rear suspension. Sure it handles more like a car, but can't do what the Taco can.
     
  15. whippersnapper02

    whippersnapper02 Negative Nancy

    I believe the Ridgeline has a higher payload capacity.
     
  16. beandip007

    beandip007 New Member

    toyota tacoma
    Payload (lb.) 27
    1350
    1340
    1235

    Honda Ridgeline
    1537 1559 1537

    Touche sir, touche. I have a feeling that is more of how our beds are made, vs. ridgelines integrated into the unibody. Drum brakes and solid axle math usually proves to cary more weight.
     
  17. OP
    Tacoma Dave

    Tacoma Dave Well-Known Member

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