CB Radio

Discussion in '2016 + Toyota Tacoma' started by jdr3366, Jun 17, 2020.

  1. B.C.

    B.C. Well-Known Member

    A lot off the range.
    Line of sight is key.
    It trying to receive signals from the front, through the cab metal, is going to kill your range.
     
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  3. OP
    jdr3366

    jdr3366 Well-Known Member

    Too bad.
     
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  4. freighter72

    freighter72 Well-Known Member

    When I am on the road I use a 4' firestik. (3-5 mile range) On the trail it's a 2' firestik (about 2 mile range)
     
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  5. TacomaLance

    TacomaLance Well-Known Member

    Firestiks are great antennas. But you do not want to mount horizontally. Drastically reduces effective radiation pattern thus reducing your overall range. Your antenna needs to be in the open as much as possible to take advantage of its full potential.
     
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  6. OP
    jdr3366

    jdr3366 Well-Known Member

    I could live with 2 to 5 mile range.
     
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  7. freighter72

    freighter72 Well-Known Member

    Just a late thought to this thread....... I got back from off-roading with a group in central California and they were all running 2 meter radios. To be legal for transmit you need to be licensed. I am in the process of getting my license because it is worth it. Everyone in the group sounded crystal clear and range was not an issue for anyone. I do love my Uniden radio but I am jumping to 2 meter just for the superior range and audio quality.
     
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  8. Cape taco

    Cape taco Well-Known Member

    I was a junior in high school just started driving !
     
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  9. OP
    jdr3366

    jdr3366 Well-Known Member

    Interesting. Is this a hand-held device? I read that it is not for communicating with CB radios.

    freighter72, please post more information and experience.

    Does anybody else have experience with this?
     
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2020
    B.C. likes this.
  10. B.C.

    B.C. Well-Known Member


    Its just the wave length of the signal is about 2 meters roughly.
    Operates from about 144 to 148 mhz frequency i think...but please don't quote me on that.
     
    dirtytaco likes this.
  11. B.C.

    B.C. Well-Known Member

    Found this, so took a screen shot.
    Screenshot_20200701-090623_Chrome.jpg
     
  12. B.C.

    B.C. Well-Known Member

    I run vhf radios in all of my semi trucks, equipment, and in my pickup to keep in touch with my employees.
    Because a regular two way vhf radio like I use covers something like 136 to 175 mhz, a regular truck radio will communicate with a 2 meter radio.
    If you use a cb radio, or uhf radio, it will not. CB is a lot lower frequency, I'm not sure what exactly but I believe around 40 or 50 mhz, and uhf radios are a lot higher, somewhere over 400 mhz.
    I'm mostly familiar with vhf, and a bit with ham, and 2 meters.
    CB is all but dead in my area, almost all radios are vhf, ham, or 2 meters.
     
  13. B.C.

    B.C. Well-Known Member

    And you didn't hear this from me, but some models of Tad vhf radios, are easily hacked allowing the user to program in any channels they want. So say you come to a logging road, and its radio controlled, but you don't have that channel already in your radio, it takes about 20 seconds to put it in.
    At least where I live its not technically legal, but most people do it. Just don't be a dick and talk on someone's private channel without permission is all. I have a private company channel, and it is mandatory for any trucks hauling from my gravel pit to have the channel to communicate, and not be a hazard. Some guys have to go to a radio shop, with a letter I give them allowing permission, and then the shop programs in my channel....its ridiculous!
    Have a hacked Tad, just pop the channel in, and done.
    The hack takes about 3 minutes.
     
  14. OP
    jdr3366

    jdr3366 Well-Known Member

    Thanks for all the responses. I lack sophistication. So, here are my dumb questions.

    Do most truckers (or anybody) still use CB radios for on the road communication?

    If not, what do they use?

    Depending on these answers, what is your recommendation for a relatively low cost system with the shortest antenna that will let me communicate with people on the road at a distance of 2 to 5 miles?

    You can tell I'm still hung up on the antenna length.
     
    B.C. likes this.
  15. Cape taco

    Cape taco Well-Known Member

    20200701_183739~2.jpg
    Me my friend Charlie he had the 77 bandit we put a 67 400 GTO motor in it no smog crap on that beast !
     
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  16. B.C.

    B.C. Well-Known Member

    I believe that it is somewhat regional, so can't speak for everyone. But here, 99.9% of vehicles fitted with a radio, use a vhf style.
    Range is extremely dependent upon the terrain you are in.
    My pickup truck radio will easily receive and transmit over 40 kms if in a relatively open and flat area. When I get into extreme mountains, or downtown in the city with tall buildings all around, then 2 kms max, could be less.
    I personally use a Shakespeare 5215 about 3 feet long in total, but front fender mounted, its not a lot higher than the cab roof, and it is flexible so running into tree branches and the garage door doesn't hurt it.
    Don't buy a cheap $20 antenna, spend $70 on a good one. Get a radio with good wattage to, that will increase your transmission power.
    My go to radio is a Tad M10, I love them, reliable, clear sound, awesome transmitter, store up to 396 channels, and can be hacked to program it yourself. They seem to last forever, despite the vibration of trucks and equipment, and being used 12 hours a day 360 days a year.
     
    Last edited: Jul 1, 2020
  17. B.C.

    B.C. Well-Known Member

    Screenshot_20200701-180941_Chrome.jpg

    Only $51 in the USA, everything is cheaper south of the 49th.
     
  18. B.C.

    B.C. Well-Known Member

    FRS-GMRS antenna mount.jpg
    Don't over think about the mounting, do similar to this person, fender mounted is fine, and really easy to wire, just sneak the cable through an existing grommet in the firewall if you want to, or buy a grommet to, and drill a hole. Fuse the power wire to the radio, and try mounting it where you don't smash your knees into it every time you jump into the truck. Some idiots mount radios right where they are perfect to hit every time I get in...probably doesn't help any that I'm tall.
     
  19. tooter

    tooter Well-Known Member

    awesome photo, Cape!
     
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  20. OP
    jdr3366

    jdr3366 Well-Known Member

  21. Taco_Tuesday

    Taco_Tuesday Well-Known Member

    Given the frequency range, you're probably gonna have to use at least a 2 footer to get any distance. Still has to be LOS, and anything more than an inch thick will degrade signal (buildings, fences, trees, etc.). Realistically, even with a 2 footer, expect about 1.5 miles at best. Weather will probably shrink that to 1 mile, tops. Better to just get a 3-4 foot antenna if you want to get your money's worth.
     
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