crankShaft pulley maintenance

JayQQ97

MW surVivor ... clutched. 343k on the 0D0
? - how to keep this pricey item from rotting out again

i tried some corroseal last year to convert back to black but it flaked, heated and or washed off
currently am trying some eastWood rust converter onit where i can reach at it to see how it goes during the winter, its much blacker look than the corroseal product is

this is what it looked like brand new from 18 months ago, it certainly does not look nice like this anymore :(





new crankShaft pulley April 2o21.jpg



384$ on the holiday 41 per cent 0FF sale

MSRP 654$

452$ at 31 per cent 0FF
 
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oh, wait...
buffalo-bill-696x443.jpg


that part is actually the clutch throwout bearing diagnosed on numerous occasion by ASE master Toyota techs with decades. Of combined experience
it broke out and launched right into a moving fan blade :eek: on a hard raining cats & dogs highway stop
 
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i've been a bit curious for awhile now...

what (if anything) would happen should you continue to drive with a broken unbalanced crank pulley
 
Depending on engine rpm......

slight to heavy vibration. damage to bearings. Fatigue failures...... No good can come from an unbalanced crank pulley.
 
Depending on engine rpm......

slight to heavy vibration. damage to bearings. Fatigue failures...... No good can come from an unbalanced crank pulley.

yeah thats what i was thinking!... my engine should be roasted 'n destroyed :(
i cannot believe how fortunate i am that it did not completely fall out from under the truck whilst rolling back down i80 for 50 miles and just 'happened' to spot it sitting there while i was scratching my head at the charred fan blade it apparently was clipping during one of those frequent oil level inspections after a hot run
 
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the rubber on the balancer is vulcanized to the pulley?
what might cause it to separate, its not very common on the 3.4 per my exhaustive research on the interWebs
 
The rubber would have to be vulcanized to the pulley. Otherwise, it is a separate part.

Any part or any process can fail. The reasons can be as simple as poor processing to complex like a shearing at the interface. Manufacturing is never 100% perfect. Some failures happen early, some take a long time to occur.

FWIW, the rubber between the metal pieces is there to act as a damper. No amount of "corrosion" products will lengthen the rubber's life. In fact, those products are more likely to be detrimental to the rubber. Suggest replace the pulley and leave the "corrosion" products for other parts of the truck.
 
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The rubber would have to be vulcanized to the pulley. Otherwise, it is a separate part.

Any part or any process can fail. The reasons can be as simple as poor processing to complex like a shearing at the interface. Manufacturing is never 100% perfect. Some failures happen early, some take a long time to occur.

FWIW, the rubber between the metal pieces is there to act as a damper. No amount of "corrosion" products will lengthen the rubber's life. In fact, those products are more likely to be detrimental to the rubber. Suggest replace the pulley and leave the "corrosion" products for other parts of the truck.
That pulley is a 650$ part at MSRP! Its Not something I care to keep replacing every 193k miles or 23 years, if it was just age that made it separate IDK

Someone at another Toyota forum suggested to put engine oil in there and might work to keep the salty slop out that can find it's way in there
 
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Umm..... I would counsel against using engine oil on a rubber damper. Depending on the type of "rubber", the oil may aggravate the damage. There are thousands of concoctions of rubber. Typically, formulated for a specific task. Would you smear engine oil on the cab isolator bushings? or shock absorber bushings? engine mounts?

Based on miles that part has a cost of $0.003/mile. Based on time the part has a cost of $2.53/month. I own very few things with such a low cost of possession. Consider, this is a part with very infrequent failures across multiple vehicles.
 
This is the audio of that failing clutch bearing a day or so before it launched itself into the moving fan blade

 
I'm very confused.

The clutch bearing is located near the engine flywheel typically near the firewall. At the opposite end of the engine is where the fan blade lives near the radiator.

How did the bearing launch into the fan????
 
Oh! this is going to be a good old taco story, I can already feel it lol
a story of trust....
It all started one day in May or June of '19, once the AC went into seasonal service on the freeway, the ac is most always off on the city streets in town after a hot lengthy freeway run... So one day I started hearing this very faint and odd rattle and banging, it seemed like it was coming from behind the glovebox! It happened briefly in gears 2-3-4 and possibly 5th I don't recall anymore. At 2.1k rpm the banging would trigger and was gone before 2.5k rpm in each gear. I did not like this noise, it was awful :(

to be continued...
 
So I was made aware today that I was even more fortunate that when that clutch bearing broke free and launched into the moving fan blade that it possibly could've damaged the end of the crankshaft
My blood boils even thicker... :oops:
 
Ah.....in a roundabout way you have answered my question.

I was thinking clutch bearing as in the part between the engine and transmission.

YOU are talking about the Clutch Pulley on the AC compressor. This changes all sorts of things.
 
Ah.....in a roundabout way you have answered my question.

I was thinking clutch bearing as in the part between the engine and transmission.

YOU are talking about the Clutch Pulley on the AC compressor. This changes all sorts of things.
No it changes nothing :(

I was reassured on several occasions that weird chatter in the engine the clutch throw out bearing
So I then unconcerned myself about the random noise and did not worry UNTIL I heard the fan swoosh swoosh swoosh roughly 4 months later after reassurance
 
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But it COULD'VE been the clutch pulley on the ac compressor
I took it into the dealer service in the summer of 2020 to ask them about this odd chatter
Well once they heard me spit out it acts up after the AC has been operated they immediately wanted 150$ to diagnose the AC
I told them the AC works just fine afaik
 
Changes my responses.

This shouldn't cause damage to the crankshaft. Yes, it could possibly damage the drive pulley on the end of the crankshaft. Simple part that can be replaced with some effort. Same for the pulley on the AC compressor.

The rubber in the AC pulley is there to absorb or to ease the shock of the clutch engaging the compressor when the engine is at high rpm.

Yes, the rubber is vulcanized to the metal parts. No, do not use any sort of "rust preventative" on the rubber.
 
I don't know much at all about the ac pulley, thats the compressor?
Other than it's original and has some weathered crusty onit
 
Yes, the AC compressor has a pulley on the front to drive the compressor.

I can't speak for the Gen1 but I know the AC compressor/pulley is located low left side of the engine on the Gen 2 with the 4.0L V-6. I would think if the AC pulley came off that it would go down under the truck and the serpentine drive belt would go slack leading to loss of power steering, cooling fan and alternator power.

Even so. Your issue may be resolved by replacing a pair of pulleys. One on the AC compressor and one on the end of the crankshaft.
 
Yes, the AC compressor has a pulley on the front to drive the compressor.

I can't speak for the Gen1 but I know the AC compressor/pulley is located low left side of the engine on the Gen 2 with the 4.0L V-6. I would think if the AC pulley came off that it would go down under the truck and the serpentine drive belt would go slack leading to loss of power steering, cooling fan and alternator power.

Even so. Your issue may be resolved by replacing a pair of pulleys. One on the AC compressor and one on the end of the crankshaft.
Gen1 3.4L has 3 separate drive belts!
 
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